Tim

Tim Derouet

Geoffrey

Geoffrey Jameson

 

The Awards

The Derouet Jameson Memorial Foundation (DJMF) as it is now represents the result of combining two awards into one charitable foundation. Historically the awards were:

The “Tim Derouet Award” made to outstanding candidates who passed the Master of Wine Examination

The “Geoffrey Jameson Award” made to the most promising young graduate who has passed the WSET Diploma examination.

Clause 7 of the original Declaration of Trust set out in May 1976 says:

“The trust will use its funds in advancing the education of persons who are employed in the Wine and Spirit Trade or who are proposing to be so employed to attend Colleges Institutions educational tours or courses for further education (whether in the UK or abroad) relative to the Wine and Spirit Trade by paying their fees or travelling or other incidental expenses or providing them with maintenance allowances always provided that candidates for these benefits shall be selected by the Trustees for the time being of the WSET as persons requiring financial assistance to undertake or complete their education in the Wine and Spirit Trade”.

The awards have gone through a number of changes. From 1979 to 2008, the Tim Derouet Memorial Award provided a prize for the best overall MW paper. The Geoffrey Jameson Award started in 1997 and provided funds for WSET students for the MW 1st Year Study Group till 2008. Minutes of a meeting of the Trustees on 3rd March 2008 suggested an amalgamation of the funds to provide a Derouet-Jameson Award. This was formalised at our next meeting on 6th October 2008, with the amalgamation taking place on 6th April 2009. The first joint Derouet Jameson Award was in 2009.

From 2011, we started to make 2 awards of £1,000 each to Plumpton College for their top 2 students who are deemed to be worthy of and who require assistance with funding. This increased to 2 awards of £1,050 from 2015 and 3 awards of £1,050 from 2017.

 

The Tim Derouet Award

The Tim Derouet Award has been made to outstanding candidates who passed the Master of Wine Examination. It has been awarded only in years when the Examiners consider there to be an exceptional performance across all papers by a candidate.

The award is worth £3,000, providing funds to let the winner travel to a wine region of their choice, typically an area they have not previously visited. The only request that the trustees make is that the winner produces on their return a report on where they have been and what they have seen.

The award was created in memory of Tim Derouet, who died in 1975. He was one of the wine trade’s larger-than-life characters. Within a career that spanned nearly 40 years, he left a lasting memory amongst those who knew him as a happy and generous man who put enormous effort into encouraging younger people to come into the trade and share what he enjoyed so much. The first award was made in 1979. A full list of those who have won the award is given in the Awards and Bursaries section.

 

The Geoffrey Jameson Award

The Geoffrey Jameson Award has been made to the most promising young graduates who have passed the WSET Diploma examination, to assist them in furthering their wine trade career, specifically in studying towards the Master of Wine qualification.

Typically, three candidates are selected and then interviewed by members of the Geoffrey Jameson Trust. An award of £2,500 towards the cost of the Master of Wine study course can be provided to a student who impresses the panel with their career plans and potential, and who the panel deems to be worthy of funding. The students that win this award are on average within the top 5 per cent achievers in the whole Diploma qualification.

The Award was set up in 1997 in memory of Geoffrey Jameson and is administered within the same charity as the Tim Derouet Award (the two were great friends and Geoffrey helped inaugurate the Tim Derouet Award).

Geoffrey Jameson entered the wine trade at the end of the war and was for many years Managing Director of Justerini and Brooks. He was one of the first five Masters of Wine and later Chairman of the Institute of Masters of Wine. He was Master of the Worshipful Company of Vintners in 1980/81 and Clerk to the Royal Cellars from 1964 to 1979. The Award reflects the enthusiasm with which he used to encourage younger people in the wine trade to expand their knowledge of wine.